Noise pollution: Non-auditory effects on health

noise pollution

We all know that noise pollution can severely impair our hearing – it is a well-known fact and it is quite logical when you think about it. However, there is more to noise effects than this – some problems can be somewhat non-auditory. Although we can’t stress enough how important it is to steer clear of noise-polluted areas for the sake of your hearing, in this article, we’ve decided to explore other unwanted effects this issue may cause upon your health.

How to Stop Noise Pollution

Heart

Studies have shown that constant exposure to traffic noise can account for as much as 3 percent of heart disease-related deaths in Europe, but how is this exactly related? Well, you might have guessed it – stress! Stress caused by noise pollution works as any other form of stress does – it elevates stress hormones, such as adrenaline, noradrenaline, and cortisol, which lead to high blood pressure in the long term, which can further cause stroke and heart failure. The silent killer here is outlined in the fact that you can easily get accustomed to this noise, even though your body really won’t. Subconsciously and beyond your control, the biological effects caused by noise pollution are taking place. The problems here are especially significant when it comes to women. A large number of women are severely noise-sensitive and chronic noise exposure can increase the risk of heart disease-related mortality by as much as 80%.

Air Pollution

Another key factor, when it comes to noise pollution, is the fact that it is more than usually extremely related to air pollution – something that we’re well aware is extremely bad for health. People who live near roadways, airports, especially industrial areas are exposed to air, as well as noise pollution. Both of these undesirable circumstances increase cardiovascular disease risk in similar ways – which can severely impact your autonomic nervous system. Autonomic nervous system, or ANS, is involved in regulating blood pressure, blood sugar levels, viscosity, and clotting. The arterial hardening measure, known as thoracic aortic calcification, or TAC score is increased by both air and noise pollution, by 20 percent and 8 percent, respectively.

Sleep

Naturally, most of us can’t really sleep in loud spaces. If your neighborhood suffers from heavy-duty noise, you won’t be able to catch a lot of shut-eye. Sleep deprivation has physical, as well as psychological negative effects, which are not something to be disregarded so easily. In addition to being in a terrible mood the day after a sleepless night, you will experience negative psychological effects, which can further lead to physical issues, such as breathing problems and raise stress levels, which brings us back to the very beginning of this article. In order to avoid noise pollution, caused sleep deprivation, it would be a good idea to isolate your home properly. Quality soundproofing can go a long way in keeping you well-rested and healthy and even though you still might end up exposed to noise in traffic, you are greatly dwindling the negative effects upon your health by isolating your walls and windows – quality isolation can provide a 70% noise reduction for your windows.

Noise pollution can turn out quite damaging for your health – by ignoring this issue you’re risking mental complications, as well as sleep deprivation and potential heart issues, in addition to hearing loss. Even though the greatest impact noise makes is hearing-related, these issues are mere additions to all noise-related problems and some of them are even more dangerous than hearing loss. Noise pollution can cause many problems and make sure you are aware of these is a large step towards providing better health for you and your loved ones.

 

DianaSmith

Diana Smith is a business entrepreneur and grateful mom of two beautiful girls. She writes about topics related to business, marketing, travel, and technology.

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